Creative Partnerships for Public Outputs

One of the great things about working in a Museum is its collections. The sheer number of exceptional quality specimens is mindblowing, potentially overwhelming and a bit of a mystery if you are not a subject specialist!

As part of our post-16 programme we work hard to put those subject specialists, or Curators as we call them here, in direct learning partnerships with students. A good example of this is the exciting work I have been doing with our Curator of Palaeontology, David Gelsthorpe. David is one of the Museum’s keen bloggers and has previously posted on his experience of working with the Learning Team.

We have been lucky enough to receive funding as part of a Museum’s Learning Partnership, called Real World Science coordinated by the Natural History Museum, London. This funding provides staff time and resources to make such study days free to charge to our participating students. David also used this funding to support his recent conference trip to Scarborough to go and speak to other museum geologists about his work on the A Level Study day.

In the New Year the group that we worked with to develop the sessions, Greenhead Collge in Huddersfield, will be back with their new AS students and David and I will be developing a new study session for their A2 students. These sessions will be led by David, with support from the Learning Team, and provide the students with access to high quality fossils and take part in activities that relate directly to their examination syllabus. Below are some images from the first study day we ran, and to quote one of the students, it was ‘fossil-riffic!’.

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2 thoughts on “Creative Partnerships for Public Outputs

  1. It is really exciting to be running these sessions.

    One of the best bits is getting out some of the amazing fossils from the collection for people to handle. When you can touch some of the world’s finest amber and other incredible fossils such as trilobites and mammoths, geology really comes to life!

  2. Pingback: Engage with the Experts: Investigative Geology « The Learning Team, The Manchester Museum

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