Join our award-winning Shabtis in Schools programme

Imagine if your school could host a real ancient Egyptian museum artefact.

What could you do with this unique opportunity?

MM_280219_079

…This experience with the shabti is something these children will tell their grandchildren.”

Our award-winning Shabtis in Schools programme places ancient Egyptian shabti funerary figures in primary and secondary schools across Manchester. The awe and wonder of this artefact is a powerful tool to inspire your pupils, staff and local community.

Manchester Museum is pleased to invite the next phase of schools to take part in this very special programme for 2021-22.

“A fantastic stimulus to hook the children”

“It has been a fantastic opportunity for us [teachers] to develop our subject knowledge”

“The kudos of actually housing a real artefact from a museum put a real positive focus on the school”

This project aims to:

  • raise aspiration and build skills in history for pupils
  • expand subject knowledge and build skills for teachers
  • provide a focus for your community engagement
  • promote cross-curricular collaboration between professionals, inside and outside of the school
  • build social and cultural capital for your pupils

We are offering:

  • professional installation of a genuine museum artefact in your school between January and April 2022 (no additional insurance or security required)
  • a collaborative planning and CPD event in September 2021, and a network of like-minded teachers
  • resources, activity suggestions and case studies to inspire your planning
  • access to museum professional educators, conservators and curators including Egyptologist Dr Campbell Price

The package in total is worth around £1500, but this year we are able to offer it free of charge in return for detailed evaluative feedback and active contribution to resource development.

What would you do with your shabti?

Schools from the first two cohorts have:

  • Invited families, communities and other schools to visit in-school museums, curated and guided by students themselves
  • Hosted both live and digital talks and debates with museum curators, for teachers, students and families
  • Used the shabti to develop teacher skills in teaching history using source material, and in coordinating whole-school projects
  • Held whole-school Shabti Days, which inspired artwork, food, games and more

Get more ideas from the pilot schools case study and blog post!

MM_280219_008

Parrs Wood High School Shabti Display 

Who is eligible?

We are able to offer this opportunity to a limited number of state-funded schools inside the M60 motorway.

Want to know more?

Find out more abut what is entailed in the project, our commitment to you, and what we ask in return, by reading the draft project agreement before you apply. You can also contact us by email with any questions or to arrange a phone call.

What are we looking for?

This is a creative, innovative programme where the more you put in the more you will get out. Our first two cohorts of schools have shown that the hook of the artefact is a fantastic way to bring staff, pupils and the community together around a real point of pride and inspiration.

We have a very limited number of spaces on the project and expect demand to be high. Therefore we will prioritise schools who can demonstrate in their application that:

  • their teachers will benefit from the collaborative CPD and development opportunities
  • they will use their shabti creatively (e.g. across a broad curriculum, to teach history innovatively, or for parental engagement in learning)
  • the shabti would have a wide impact in their school community and build cultural capital (e.g. a high number of individuals will be in contact with it and/or plans will allow for deep and rich engagement)

Before you apply …

Please make sure you have read the draft project agreement of expected timescales, our commitment to you, and what we’d be asking your school to commit to. Please make sure your senior leadership team have also read this before you apply. A final project agreement will be sent to the successful schools, for return before the summer holidays.

Ready to go?

Tell us your plans by applying online by 5pm on Tuesday 13 July 2021.

What will happen next?

We will notify successful applicants by Wednesday 14 July. We will then ask for signed copies of the project agreement to be returned by Monday 19 July. More details of resources available will be sent over the summer to aid your long-term planning, which can be completed in full during the CPD event (essential) in September 2021.

“It’s a fantastic hook, and it offers so many opportunities to use as a stimulus for enquiry, not just in history, but there’s so many other options [like] philosophical debates, writing historical fiction about it. There’s all this discovery that children can have and I think that’s a really exciting thing”

“I think it has engaged all our pupils and it has created learning opportunities to develop those key skills, research, that analysis, that evaluation, which are skills they need in all subjects …This experience with the shabti is something these children will tell their grandchildren.”

Apply now

Ancient Egypt at Central Library

youngrichfamous_contentheader

Manchester Museum’s latest installation at Manchester’s Central Library – Young, Rich & Famous – challenges us to think of how we will be remembered after death and what we will leave behind.

If you’re missing our Ancient Worlds galleries, but you’re taking a class into central Manchester this school year, this could be a great way to enrich your history topic in 2020 – with zero entry fee.

What might my class do there?

We’ve put together notes, activity sheets and resources for key stages 2 and 3 to help you get the most out of your class’s visit. Your pupils might:

  • Help Princess Isis to entertain the gods
  • Sketch and annotate an artefact like an archaeologist
  • Compare ancient Egyptian tombs to modern social media
  • Debate whether these artefacts should be in Manchester
  • and more!

The display can comfortably fit around 15 children at once. Later in 2020, we expect to offer a combined visit to Central Library using our amazing Inflatable Museum at a discounted rate. Contact Jenny to express your interest.

How do I book?

To book your visit to Central Library, please contact Angela Rawcliffe.

Can I make a day of it?

In the same building, why not ask Central Library if they can provide a workshop on books about ancient Egypt, or visit Archives Plus to get stuck into some local history?

You might also combine your library visit with a trip to the nearby historic John Rylands Library on Deansgate (perhaps for their popular Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs workshop), or to Manchester Art Gallery, just across the road.

Central Library is right next to the Metrolink St Peter’s Square stop.

Let us know how you get on!

Download: Activity sheets and teacher notes

Join our award-winning Shabtis in School project

Imagine if your school could host a real ancient Egyptian museum artefact.

What could you do with this unique opportunity?

MM_280219_079

…This experience with the shabti is something these children will tell their grandchildren.”

Our award-winning Shabtis in School project places ancient Egyptian shabti funerary figures in primary and secondary schools across Manchester. The awe and wonder of this artefact is a powerful tool to inspire your pupils, staff and local community.

Manchester Museum is pleased to invite the next phase of schools to take part in this very special project.

“A fantastic stimulus to hook the children”

“It has been a fantastic opportunity for us [teachers] to develop our subject knowledge”

“The kudos of actually housing a real artefact from a museum put a real positive focus on the school”

This project aims to:

  • raise aspiration and build skills in history for pupils
  • expand subject knowledge for teachers
  • provide a focus for your community engagement
  • enhance visibility and reputation of your school
  • promote cross-curricular collaboration between professionals, inside and outside of the school
  • build social and cultural capital for your pupils

We are offering:

  • professional installation of a genuine museum artefact in your school between January and June 2020 (no additional insurance or security required)
  • a collaborative planning and CPD event in September 2019, and a network of like-minded teachers
  • resources, activity suggestions and case studies to inspire your planning
  • access to museum professional educators, conservators and curators including Egyptologist Dr Campbell Price

The package in total is worth around £1500, but this year we are able to offer it free of charge in return for detailed evaluative feedback and active contribution to resource development.

What would you do with your shabti?

Get some ideas from the pilot schools case study.

MM_280219_008

Parrs Wood High School Shabti Display 2018-19

Want to know more?

Contact us by email with any questions or to arrange a phone call. Alternatively pop into our Late event on Thursday 20 June for a chat.

What are we looking for?

This is a creative, innovative project where the more you put in the more you will get out. Our pilot schools have shown that the hook of the artefact is a fantastic way to bring staff, pupils and the community together around a real point of pride and inspiration.

We have a very limited number of spaces on the project and expect demand to be high. Therefore we will prioritise schools who can demonstrate in their application that:

  • their teachers will benefit from the collaborative CPD and development opportunities
  • they will use their shabti creatively (e.g. across a broad curriculum, to teach history innovatively, or for parental engagement in learning)
  • the shabti would have a wide impact in their school community (e.g. a high number of individuals will be in contact with it and/or plans will allow for deep and rich engagement)

Before you apply …

See this draft outline of expected timescales, our commitment to you, and what we’d be asking your school to commit to. Please make sure your senior leadership team have read this before you apply.

Ready to go?

Tell us your plans by applying online by 5pm on 28 June 2019.

What will happen next?

We will notify successful applicants by Friday 5 July. We will then ask for signed copies of the project agreement to be returned by Monday 15 July. More details of resources available will be sent over the summer to aid your long-term planning, which can be completed in full during the CPD event (essential) in September 2019.

“It’s a fantastic hook, and it offers so many opportunities to use as a stimulus for enquiry, not just in history, but there’s so many other options [like] philosophical debates, writing historical fiction about it. There’s all this discovery that children can have and I think that’s a really exciting thing”

“I think it has engaged all our pupils and it has created learning opportunities to develop those key skills, research, that analysis, that evaluation, which are skills they need in all subjects …This experience with the shabti is something these children will tell their grandchildren.”

Apply now

‘Extinction or Survival?’ – new video resource for schools

We have a new and exciting resource to share with you today, created by 60 Year 3 children from Crab Lane Community Primary School in Crumpsall.

This short video is designed to be used inside the  fabulous ‘Extinction or Survival?’ exhibition, at Manchester Museum until 20 April 2017.

The exhibition contains some difficult stories about the many species that are no longer with us, from the dodo to the Tasmanian tiger. But it also tells a story of hope: what can we do to help endangered species?

It will be of special interest to KS2 teachers who are working on ‘Living Things and their Habitats’.

To use the video, we recommend bringing tablets to the Museum and sharing them between small groups of children with an adult. You can load the video via this page, and pause it each time you see the name of a species to allow you time to find it in the exhibition. You can also pause at the ‘Over to you’ questions, as a chance to get the children thinking more deeply about the exhibition’s themes. The video can also be used outside the Museum if needed.

The children of Crab Lane would love to know what you think of their video! Let us know  by adding a comment below.

If you would like to visit ‘Extinction or Survival?’ you can do so for free, but please let us know you are coming by completing the booking enquiry form on our website. This helps ensure a great experience for you and for the other schools visiting our (very busy!) museum that day. You might also want to consider our popular KS2 session ‘Habitats and You’.

The story behind the video …

Every year, Kids in Museums ‘Takeover Day’ invites children into meaningful roles in museums and galleries. As our ‘Extinction or Survival?’ exhibition was due to open in September 2016, we thought it would be great if some children could create a really useful resource for other schools visiting the exhibition.

Using  contacts through the wonderful Schools Network Choir, we found two Year 3 teachers from Crab Lane who were really excited to do something a bit different with their classes that term.

We met up and planned an amazing series of activities for the kids: first, both classes came separately to visit the museum, to research the exhibition and to learn what makes a great tour. We all practised saying in big loud voices, “WELCOME TO MANCHESTER MUSEUM!!!”

Then, back in school, the children worked in small groups with their teachers to devise their own tours. This means that the tours are all the children’s own words – amazing.

In the meantime, staff at the Museum were busy arranging loads of great activities for Takeover Day itself. Almost every department was involved, from conservation and collections to marketing, volunteers and even the Vivarium team!

368c259d-4466-4d5e-ad31-f54c4674b335On 18 November – a cold and snowy day – all 60 kids descended on the Museum for a pretty full-on day! All the children gave their tours LIVE for members of the  public. This was incredibly brave but they had lovely clear voices and even took questions from the audience! They were also total pros being filmed by Steve from the Museum.

As well as their tours, the kids made a giant rainforest collage, helped clean objects in the conservation studios, went behind the scenes in the Entomology stores, and welcomed visitors.

At the very end of the day, all the children said they would love to work in a museum when they grow up. We can’t wait!

Manchester Museum would like to say a huge THANK YOU to all the children, teachers and other staff involved in making the project such a success. We hope you enjoy their video!

Ancient Egypt visits Artscool

Picture 032

Last Tuesday and Wednesday, Manchester Museum took a selection of ancient Egyptian objects out to Artscool, an arts festival for primary school children at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Cheshire Campus in Crew. The week-long arts festival has aimed to raise the level of arts engagement in the area, and focused on the Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

Work in progress

Work in progress

Over 2 days, the museum ran 6 workshops, each for 20 primary pupils, in conjunction with Emma Thackham. While one half of the group developed their investigative skills by interpreting a selection of ancient Egyptian artefacts related to the theme of language and learning, the other half of the group worked with the artist to incorporate modern equivalents of these objects into an art installation.

Some images of the results can be found below…

A barrel of heads!

A barrel of heads!

What can I say?!

What can I say?!

A colourful arrangement

A colourful arrangement…

Be a climate researcher – Citizen Science – Make a rain gauge!

Here at the Manchester Museum we absolutely love projects that get pupils involved in real life science that matters – they are, after all, the researchers of tomorrow.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

How much rain falls in Manchester?

So we were really pleased to get information on the ‘Crowdsourcing4Climate: Community Rainfalls Collections’ pilot project, which hopes to get the public and schools collecting rainfall data to add to the data we can use in all sorts of scientific research. It’s simple but could be a brilliant and effective school project and will support research at Manchester, Birmingham and Leicester Universities.

We’ve attached some information on how you can get involved and would love to see local schools contributing – so do take a look and let us know if you need any further information C4C_TeacherGuide-1.

The Manchester Museum Comes To You

Pupils from Wilbraham Primary School get hands on with Ancient Egyptian objects.

The Manchester Museum’s redeveloped ‘Museum  Comes To You’ schools outreach offer is coming soon!

We have a brand new Egypt exploration session where you can help to solve the mystery of a raided tomb, learn about and handle ancient Egyptian objects and have a go at making your own scarab beetle or Egyptian headdress!
We have been super impressed by the love and knowledge that primary schools from far and wide have for all things Egyptian and can’t wait to visit more and more amazing schools. Watch this space for more information…

Matthew Moss: What is Archaeology?

Recently, Bryan Sitch, our wonderful Curator of Archaeology visited Matthew Moss High School as part of an ‘Archaeology Day’ they had planned. He provided some of their Year 8 students with a talk on ‘What is Archaeology’ in order to inspire and inform them on this fascinating subject. He took along some basic finds from our collection and engaged the students in exploring what they thing archaeology is and how it is a destructive, but potentially very informative, process. According to the teachers, this really helped in increasing students’ understanding of the subject.

We;re really lucky that we have great curators who work with us in the Learning Team to make our programme successful and although we  don’t currently offer Outreach Curator talks on a regular basis, sometimes we can organise the occasional visit here and there on special request. If this is something you might be interested in, please contact me: catherine.lumb@manchester.ac.uk

Happy New Year!

So the festivities are over and after a quiet spell on the Learning Blog we are all back at the Museum and Art Gallery ready to enthuse students and make learning outside the classroom a fun and engaging activity for all.

Image, heads down - planning how to display things in the museum

We will be blogging about our new projects and workshops soon, but in the meantime why not check out the Learning Pages for The Manchester Museum and The Whitworth Art Gallery to see what we have to offer. If you don’t find what you are looking for, get in touch and we will be happy to help if we can!

We would like to thank the following schools for visiting The Manchester Museum between 18th & 22nd Oct 2010

Barton Moss Primary, Eccles

Image, The entrance to The Manchester Museum

Brookburn Primary, Chorlton

Ermysted Grammar, Skipton

Great Marsden St Johns Primary, Nelson

Halifax High

Heathland Primary, Sandilane

Holy Family Primary, Salemoor

Loreto College

Lyndhurst Primary, Oldham

Martenscroft Children’s Centre

North Reddish Junior, Stockport

St Barnabas Primary, Openshaw

St Christopher’s Primary, Ashton Under Lyne

St Helens Primary, Barnsley

St Thomas Primary, West Houghton

Victoria Junior, Cumbria

Webster Primary, Moss Side

Wilmslow Prep School