Expressions of interest invited: ‘Discover India’ Music Day at Manchester Museum

Milapfest, in partnership with Manchester Museum and Band on the Wall, are inviting expressions of interest in a day of Indian Arts Workshops on 19 March 2018 10am-2.30pm at Manchester Museum.


Classes will spend the day learning one of four art forms, culminating in a final performance for other students and the public at the end of the day.

Workshops may include:

  • Tabla (North Indian Classical Percussion)
  • Bharatnatyam (South Indian Classical Dance)
  • Storytelling with hand and facial gestures (mudras)
  • Rangoli Art
  • Kathak (North Indian Classical dance)

These workshops will be delivered to suit the ages and abilities of the class, and are designed to be fully inclusive and interactive. The tutors for these workshops are sourced by Milapfest based on their expertise and experience in their field, several of whom are world-renowned artists and tutors.

The day is arranged through New North and South and is kindly funded by Arts Council England. It is also supporting development of Manchester Museum’s new South Asia Gallery as part of the Courtyard Project.

We have space for a limited number of students, from Reception to KS4.

Please click here to express your interest in the event before 5pm on Friday 16 February 2018.

Selected classes will be notified by 2 March. Priority will be given to schools who can explain how this day would enrich their wider curriculum.

The day’s activities are fully-funded, though schools will need to provide their own transport. For questions please contact



Remembering the impact of Partition


CM pupils

Cedar Mount Pupils in the Memories of Partition exhibition

With the 70th anniversary of the independence of India and Pakistan happening earlier this year, Manchester Museum worked with members of Manchester’s South Asian community to explore the experiences and legacies of the creation of India and Pakistan in 1947, with a dedicated exhibition space up on our third floor to share this between August 2017 and January 2018.  Memories of Partition is a collaboration between Manchester Museum, Manchester BME network, Royal Exchange Theatre and Ahmend Iqball Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre. The exhibition showcases six films featuring community members sharing their connections to Partition.

trinity pupil Dec 17

Trinity CofE School pupil in Memories of Partition

Partition is not an easy subject area to discuss, with an estimated 15 million people being displaced in possibly the largest mass migration in human history, especially not with pupils who cannot understand why this topic might be relevant for them even if they are of South Asian heritage. This is why Cat Lumb, Secondary and Post-16 Coordinator (Humanities & Arts) and Amy McDowall (Primary Coordinator) decided to invite a small number of Primary and Secondary pupils to visit the exhibition and also speak with the community participants involved; to see if it would make a difference to the way they thought about this tumultuous and difficult time in history and to help them write a response detailing their own impressions to share with those whom Partition has impacted.

Pupils had an opportunity to spend time on the Memories of Partition exhibition and make connections with the objects presented there, as well as watch some of the oral history films created to accompany the exhibition. All of these films – featuring community members either directly, or indirectly, affected by Partition – are available on the Museum’s YouTube channel and one with Dr. Gandhi (who spoke with all school groups) is highlighted below. [Please note: content is sensitive and may be upsetting.]



Primary School pupils collected images of ways that artist Reena Kallat represented ‘borders’ through nature

After seeing the exhibition, pupils were also able to view the stunning artwork of acclaimed artist Reena Saini Kallat, whose newly-commissioned sculpture Chorus can be seen alongside works that include a series of hybridised animals that represent various nations in conflict.

This thought-provoking exhibition animates the museum with new meanings and inquiries into ideas of identity, memory, history and the natural world, and links in with the topic of Partition.



Cedar Mount pupils

Cedar Mount Pupils crafting their responses



It was in this creative environment pupils were asked to collate a response to share with community participants.

For the Secondary students, this was done before speaking with any of them, and demonstrates their newly developed empathetic responses to an event that many knew about but had little understanding of:





“Now that I’ve learnt about Partition I feel disgusted and really upset imagining people being murdered and witnessing so many deaths at a young age” – KS3 Pupil

“I feel that although it was a time of suffering and sadness some people used it as the start of a new life with new experiences. It was a chance to learn new things as people moved abroad, however I still feel sad that the experience was a stressful time” – KS4 Pupil

“I’ve learnt that this is bigger than I thought because they had to go elsewhere and there was a lot of conflict.” – KS3 Pupil

Their written response was detailed and we can only share small snippets here, but some are insightful and particularly astute:

“I went through pain and conflict; being separated, abandoned and lonely; scenes of fighting, killing torturing; but we never knew why at the time; because we were young.”

“I went through many challenges, emotions and struggles; such as leaving home, and leaving our possessions like jewellery, money and memories behind. I was filled with fear as many were being killed. I went through pain and suffering as well as misery and grief. There was lots of bloodshed.”

“I came to a different country. I felt upset and uncomfortable. I missed my old house along with my family. It was confusing and scary.”

“Now I feel happy that I am living in such a developed country which not only has improved me it has improved a lot of other people, but even though I am happy, I am still sad that I have lost something un-priceable [sic.] like my childhood memories.

The Primary School pupils created a group poem following their interview with Dr. Gandhi, which can be seen here: I came from a city full of rumours. 

Some teachers also shared their thoughts about the day:

“[The activities] gave the children the chance to think about the same issue from a different perspective. It was like it gave them layers of depth to the issue.”

“It gave the Indian/Pakistini children a sense of their own history and culture. It was also interesting to hear that some people thought partition was a good thing.”

“The children came away with a greater depth and understanding of partition. It was fantastic. Thank you so much.”

With thanks to University of Manchester’s Widening Participation Department who helped to fund this project. 

Clarendon Sixth Form: Unveiling South Asia- Journey to Manchester

IMG_1106With it being the Easter holidays here in central Manchester we are very pleased to host the annual Photography display of images by Clarendon Sixth Form students. These Year 12 students are studying for their BTEC Extended Diploma in Photography and the project with Manchester Museum contributes to their units in ‘Ideas and Concepts in Art and Design’ and ‘Studio Photography’.

Typically these displays have been linked with the Museum’s entire collection and have been shown in black and white (see previous posts), but this year we focused the students on a particular theme: Manchester’s connection to South Asia.

With the Museum’s upcoming Courtyard Project to build a permanent South Asia gallery (along with a new space for special exhibitions) we encouraged the students to explore the Museum’s current South Asia collection with Living Cultures Curator Stephen Welsh. They then used this as inspiration to research Manchester’s own links with South Asia – be that through food, tradition, people or religion. Each student then presented one image to us to demonstrate those connections which appears in the final exhibition.

Clarendon Sixth Form students’ work can be seen in The Study on the 3rd floor of Manchester Museum until the summer.


South Asia TeachMeet – what we learnt


On 7 December, we hosted our first South Asia-themed TeachMeet event, launching our future work on the South Asia gallery as part of the HLF Courtyard Project.

It was a fabulous evening with some amazing speakers, experts and creative practitioners sharing ideas and inspiration for teachers from across Greater Manchester. The teachers attending had some really great insights into what they would find valuable in a future learning programme linked to the new gallery, quote of the night being “It’s about time Manchester had a South Asia gallery!”

Below is a flavour of what we all learnt about … in alphabetical order by school/organisation (where applicable) for ease!

If you are a primary or early years teacher, and have not already completed our survey about our future programme, we’d be very grateful if you could do so here.

Anjum Anwar MBE

Anjum is an educator who has worked for many years in the fields of interfaith understanding for both the Lancashire Council of Mosques and Blackburn Cathedral. She presented a passionate argument for schools to not shy away from these difficult conversations. Website coming soon.



Our night finished with Bhangracise! Bhangracise have been teaching, performing and advancing the art form of Bhangra dancing for over 12 years. They provide performances, fitness classes and school workshops across the UK. Find them on Twitter @Bhangracise.

Blackburn Museum

Stephen Irwin from Blackburn Museum spoke about his fantastic film project  about the contribution of Indian soldiers in WW2. “We Also Served” records the journey of a group of young people from Blackburn in trying to uncover the forgotten story of the Indian Army. More information about Blackburn Museum, and contact details for Steve, can be found here.


British Council

The British Council attended to share information with teachers about their ‘Connecting Classrooms’ programme: “Connecting Classrooms is a fully funded learning journey that includes face-to-face and online courses, international professional partnerships and visit funding opportunities based around the core skills.” See their poster, flyer and website for more information.

Chorlton High School

Chorlton High School is a Heritage School. Natalie Sanderson, Assistant Curriculum Leader at CHS, has spearheaded a fantastic project – ‘My Mancunium’ with their Year 7s, examining the many diffrent communities who have migrated to Manchester from Roman times onwards. The project is cross-curricular and enables pupils from this multicultural school to understand the push/pull factors in migration and feel pride in their city. Contact Natalie on twitter @historicalsando.


Computeam create incredible virtual and augmented reality resources for schools and were speaking to teachers about how the Indus Valley might be incorporated into their amazing Active Worksheets series. See them on Twitter @computeam.

Equilibrium Dance Arts

Equilibrium Dance and Arts is a social enterprise whose objective is to integrate dance, arts, mental health & well-being and research. Gaya from EDA joined us from Dubai via Skype to share her PHD research on dance in education, and teach us a few moves! You can contact Gaya via Facebook  and Twitter.

Kingsway Community Trust


Rumana Asif and the Kingsway Community Trust were presented at the TeachMeet with a first-of-its-kind award from the British Council for ‘outstanding development of the international dimension in the curriculum’. Amazing! They incorporate the British Council’s connecting classrooms in all areas of school life at every age.

Manchester Road Primary Academy

Inspired by Mahatma Gandhi, Year 1 teacher Anthony Parker is piloting a new cross-curricular topic with his class on India. They will cover geography and history, a ‘significant individual’ and even cricket in PE! In the future he will be able to bring his class to the Museum to see real artefacts from Indian history. Contact him on twitter @Anthillel.

Rubbia Ullah


Rubbia is an experienced art practitioner in museum, gallery, heritage and other settings. Her art is often inspired by South Asian techniques and practices. At the TeachMeet she shared with us techniques of basket weaving, printing and making clay pots.

Southern Voices

Southern Voices is a network of people committed to bringing the knowledge and understanding of Southern* and Black* people to the global issues that are central to education and to living in the world today. Kirit presented information about their fascinating HLF project about the impact of WW1 on colonised peoples. Southern Voices can offer ‘free’ sessions on this for schools by experienced practitioners. Email Kirit for more details.

St Marys RC Primary

The Indus Valley Civilisation – a bronze age civilisation in what is now Pakistan – is an often-overlooked alternative to ancient Egypt in the KS2 curriculum. Mark Chadwick teaches this as a fascinating (and messy!) contrast to both Egypt and prehistoric Britain to his Year 3 class.

The University of Manchester School of Arts, Languages and Cultures

Dr John Zavos and Dr Jacqueline Suthren Hirst are experts in South Asian history and religions, especially Hinduism. The TAROSA website is an excellent resource for challenging popular notions of Hinduism with older students, and the Museum of the South Asian Diaspora could support a topic on migration.

The University of Manchester School of Sociology

Professor Claire Alexander has received a University of Manchester award for ‘Outstanding benefit to society through research’. She spoke about the fantastic projects that won her this award: Banglastories, Making Histories and Our Migration Story. These are great resources and also give guidelines for teachers wanting their pupils to become oral historians.


South Asia TeachMeet

tmsouthasialandscapeWe are very excited to announce that we will be hosting an after-hours TeachMeet on 7 December  at Manchester Museum. South Asia-inspired artists, teachers, speakers and organisations will be here in The Study to share a wealth of ideas and projects at this unique event.

Speakers and experts include:

  • Prof. Claire Alexander, University of Manchester – South Asian identity and migration; oral history with young people
  • Dr John Zavos and Dr Jacqueline Suthren Hirst, University of Manchester – experts in South Asian history and religions respectively
  • Mark Chadwick – St Mary’s Primary – the Indus Valley Civilisation
  • Anjum Anwar MBE – interfaith dialogue in schools
  • Dr Gayathri Ganapathy – storytelling and cognition through South Asian dance
  • British Council – ‘Connecting Classrooms’ global education programme
  • Blackburn Museum – film project on India’s role in WW2
  • Sophie Marshall – Irk Valley Primary – RE in the Early Years

The event is also your opportunity to learn more about how teachers can be involved in our upcoming capital redevelopment known as the Courtyard Project; in particular relating to the new South Asia gallery which is planned for 2020 in a landmark partnership with the British Museum.

Come and escape the festive madness and get fresh ideas and inspiration for the New Year and beyond!

Free refreshments will be provided.

Limited tickets are available here – book now to avoid disappointment! 

Please contact / 0161 2757357 with any questions or if you would like to speak at the event.

We look forward to seeing you then!

Primary teachers: Manchester Museum Needs You! (for 2 minutes)


As you may have heard, Manchester Museum is embarking on an exciting capital redevelopment known as the Courtyard Project. We want to make sure the new galleries and display spaces – especially the South Asia gallery – meet the needs of primary teachers across Greater Manchester and beyond:

  • Have you always wanted to study a different Ancient Civilisation to Egypt?
  • Do you want to celebrate South Asian influence in your community?
  • Is there a new way of learning about world religions?
  • Is lunch space essential for your school trips?

Now is your chance to have your say!

If you are a primary or early years teacher, we would delighted if you could spare 2 minutes to complete our short survey here.

We are also looking for expressions of interest for a TeachMeet here on the evening of 7 December around the theme of South Asia. If you’ve had a great project, activity, topic or event linked to South Asia (early years, primary or secondary) and would like to be involved, please contact the Primary Learning Coordinator Amy McDowall.