The Inflatable Museum pops up in Manchester Cathedral for Tiny Science

Earlier this week the Inflatable Museum popped up in Manchester Cathedral for Tiny Science, a citywide festival specifically designed to help young children get involved in Manchester’s European City of Science celebrations.

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One of the joys of working with the Inflatable Museum is seeing it spring up in so many weird and wonderful locations, and the Cathedral provided a stunning environment to set up in for the day. It was so nice to see so many children and families head down to explore and get hands-on with our collection, and it was an amazing start to our I Spy Nature summer activity programme. From our brand new Wildlife Wednesdays, to our much loved Magic Carpet story making sessions, there’s so much to get involved with in the Museum over the next couple of months. Head to our website for more information about everything that’s going on.

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Great Science Share for European City of Science

Posted on behalf of The Great Science Share Team:

ECS16_1200x627_10Great Science Share Takeover

Wednesday 6th July, 18.00 – 20.00 at the Museum of Science and Industry

Young people from secondary schools and colleges are invited to take over the Museum of Science & Industry for a unique evening as part of the Great Science Share. Students will host a science stall and share their STEM activities and experiments to the whole city in an inspirational environment. If you would like your school to be a part of this, please register here to express your interest in hosting a stall and see full details of how to apply.

Your students can be as imaginative and creative as they like with their activities for the Great Science Share. They may want to showcase exciting experiments, a project or competition entry they’ve been working on in school or some new technology they have created.

Closing date for applications is extended to the 30th June.

If you have any questions then please don’t hesitate to get in touch info@manchestersciencecity.com.

With best wishes

The Great Science Share Team

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Poet-in-Residence Guest Blog: Poemlets

Over 2016 we’ve been incredibly lucky to have Helen Clare as a Poet-in-Residence as part of the Learning and Engagement Team. Helen wanted to develop some learning experiences using poetry and was fortunate enough to receive funding from the Arts Council to work with us on developing this.

Helen has been recording her progress on her personal blog – so if you want to know more about the project do take a look.

In the meantime, here’s a short post Helen has written for us on how to create your own ‘poemlets’.

“Over the past few months I’ve been lucky enough to spend a lot of time at the museum, writing children’s poems and learning materials as part of an Arts Council England funded project. I’ve spent a lot of time looking at things, visiting galleries and seeing those things I first missed and then looking again and again.

That opportunity to look again and again is both inspiring and dizzying, and it’s the basis of the the little writing exercise that I’m offering to the blog.

It involved ‘zooming in’ on just one object at once and asking it three questions.

  1. What do we say about the object?
  2. What does the object say about itself?
  3. What does it really mean?

Look at it really carefully and try and think about other senses as well – does it make a noise? What would it feel like if you could touch it?  Does it smell? If it moved how would it move? You might want to think about its history – and all the lives it’s been in contact with. You might also find that it has opinions quite similar to your own and that’s ok. But equally it might surprise you with what it has to say!

And that’s it. There’s no need to fancy it up. When the wind blows right it forms a perfect little poemlet all of it’s own – although you may also wish to use it as the basis of something more substantial.

Here’s an example:

I am alien. I am earth.
We are all spacedust.

Meteorite

Iron Core of Meteorite: Campo del Cielo (Field of Heaven) Argentina, 16th Century

You can see that I’ve used the first question as the title – and that the title is bigger than the poem! You could use that first question in the poem – or you could take it off altogether and make a riddle.

Look at my huge feet, how easily they carry my weight.
It was a long way. It has been a long time.

Can you guess what this is in the Museum?* I’ll put the answer at the bottom of the blog.

It’s fun to take pictures to accompany your poemlets as well.

This is my tree. I have not moved all week.
I am more threatened than threatening. Let me sleep.

snake

Green Tree Python

There are more of these poemlets on my personal blog at http://bucklesandbutterflies.blogspot.co.uk/2016/01/week-2.html

 You can tweet your poems and your photos and tag the museum @mcrmuseum, the learning team @learningMM or me @haclare.

Have fun!

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*Did you guess right? It’s Maharajah, the elephant skeleton from Manchester Gallery

 

Zara Roxburgh

Interpretation from Re-Creation: Clarendon Sixth Form Photography Display

We are proud to present our annual photography display from one of our partners – Clarendon Sixth Form – called “Interpretation from Re-Creation”.

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As usual, all of the students were given a tour of various sections of the Museum stores by our fabulous curators and had chance to explore the Museum’s galleries and find elements that sparked their interest. From there, they took their inspiration to develop a shot that would be developed in the dark room to produce a striking black and white image for display in the Museum.

Every year the students’ work never fails to impress; especially when they take one aspect of the Museum’s vast collection and communicate a statement about it in just one image. We certainly set them a challenging brief, but the students often react to it with considered thought and verve. What’s great about doing this project annually is that despite certain students identifying similar areas of the collection year after year their images are always unique and take a slightly different approach: demonstrating how imaginative and individual they all are as photographers.

Not only that, but the display also allows us to share with the public the work that we do with schools and colleges in the Learning Team. It’s a great example of a collaborative partnership that benefits the students’ skill development and provides a productive outcome for us to demonstrate how powerful the Museum’s collection can be.

You can view their pictures below, but it would be much better to see the exhibition for real. Why not come to the Museum over the next couple of weeks? The students’ work will be up in our Alhambra space (off the Link bridge on Floor 1) over the Easter holidays.

 

 

 

Join Manchester Museum’s Junior Youth Board

Junior Youth BoardManchester Museum’s Junior Youth Board is an enthusiastic group of young people who volunteer at the Museum. They meet at the Museum once a month on a Saturday.

It is a great opportunity to see what goes on behind the scenes, explore the many aspects of the Museum while meeting new people and having fun!

The Junior Youth Board is for those aged 8-13.

For more information on how to join Junior Youth Board please contact Victoria.Grant@manchester.ac.uk

 

 

Museum-inspired computer game characters

Before the festive break, we were delighted to support a Games Development project called ‘Chimera’, undertaken by first year Level 3 BTEC students at Preston’s College. Their brief called for a creature to be designed for use in a video game. The creature needed to have some biological basis in reality to create the illusion of something both familiar and at the same time, completely unique.

To help their design process the students visited Manchester Museum and spent the day sketching, collecting reference photography and taking part in an artist-led session using Museum specimens.

After a lot of development work back at college, the students came back to the Museum and presented their final designs to Museum staff to gain feedback. It was fascinating hearing how the designs had been created and how the visit to the Museum had inspired the students.

The project in conjunction with Manchester Museum was extremely valuable for our students. We were given access to the wide array of exhibitions on offer, had help from experts in their respective fields and we finalised our project by having our students present their work in front of a panel at the Museum. The experience has helped contextualise our students’ learning and we received constructive and supportive feedback from museum staff. The students enjoyed the challenge of the project and our staff were very grateful for such professionalism and enthusiasm from the museum staff.” – Graphics Tutor

Here are their design results:

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MMU trainee teachers begin their own learning journey here…

This week and next we are introducing all 210 Manchester Metropolitan University first year BE’d students to the wonderful ways  museums are engaging primary and early years children with history, science and the natural world.

The students have been discovering how learning outside the classroom works and what the benefits are to the children’s learning and development.

The students have been fantastic and very enthusiastic.

Here’s a taster of their creative flare and a snapshot of the amazing artefacts that caught their eyes.

We can’t wait for the group to be NQT’s and bring their own classes to experience the awe and wonder a trip to the museum can inspire!

Two Manchester pupils win North West schools science competition

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Left to right: Jo Beggs (Manchester Museum), Daisy Wilson (year 8 winner), Miliani Fraser-Flectcher (year 7 winner), Jenny Clucas (NWBLT) 

Pupils in Years 7 and 8 from across the North West Region have been battling it out to be crowned winners of the prestigious North West Schools Science Competition, run by the North West Business Leadership Team (NWBLT).

The challenge was to submit an essay stating “Why I want to be a scientist” in less than 500 words, with the chance to win an iPad Mini and £250 for their school to spend on science equipment.

A 13-strong shortlist was drawn up by a panel of judges (including me to represent the Museum). The shortlist were then invited to compete in the ‘Competition Final’ held last night at the Museum.

The Winner in Year 8 was Daisy Wilson from Cheadle Hulme High School.  She said “This evening has been a great opportunity.  I am delighted to have won the iPad Mini and my school is going to be really pleased to receive the £250.”   The Runner Up was Opeyemi Lamina from Withington Girls School.

The Winner in Year 7 was Miliani Fraser-Fletcher from Cheadle Hulme School who commented “I was very nervous but thought that everyone who presented tonight did really well.”   The Runner Up in Year 7 was Lottie Burnett also from Cheadle Hulme School.

It was brilliant to hear the pupil’s passion and enthusiasm for science and the high level of entries gave us judges a difficult time when making the decision over the winners!